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Tayabas In Prespective

When I was a young child Tayabas was a place I rarely visit. This was because during that time the roads from Lucena to Tayabas was not paved well. I only frequented the Baranggay of Wakas because firstly our protestant church was situated there (UCCP) and my music teacher lived there at that time.

Trips to the Tayabas market to get carabao meat (a family favorite) were an adventure and were relished by myself. This one done using our family owner-type jeep and the only other means was to either take the large jeepneys or take the minibus up to Tayabas.

Times have indeed change from those days Tayabas now is an easily accessible City and has even an FX taxi service. The ever famous 7-11 exist and so do other franchise establishment. Even with all this the City still maintains the rustic and secluded aura that makes for a town in between the past and the future.

September 26, 2008 Posted by | Rant, Tayabas, Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Cuisine of Quezon


Cuisine of Quezon is not as rich as say the other provinces but it can hold its own it taste of rather than in quantity of dishes.

Kiping

Kiping

The most famous amongst Quezon’s dishes are pancit habhab (the act of eating directly from a plate or leaf without using one’s hands or utensils) also know as pancit Lucban, longganisang lucban and the colorful yet tasteless kiping which is basically rice flour colored and formed using a leaf as a mold.

Lucena and Tayabas (there isa a debated who started which first) has its lechong lugaw which is a lugaw topped with lechon and adobong lechon.

Pancit Lucban aka Pancit Habhab

Pancit Lucban aka Pancit Habhab

Then there is Lambanog which is common in coconut growing provinces such as Batangas and Quezon and another beverage is Nipa wine aka tuba ng sasa which is basically fermented nipa sap.

Lucena also has its love affair with noodles like Lomi and its famous Chami which right now I am missing terribly.

September 12, 2008 Posted by | Food, Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lucban’s Sausage aka Longganisang Lucban

Longganisang Lucban

Longganisang Lucban

Longganisang Lucban is a sausage native to the Quezon Province in the Philippines and as it is named probably originated in Lucban, Quezon. The recipe is designed for a long shelf life and basically the sausage is self contatined since you don’t need oil to cook it.

The commonly this sausage is manufactured lovingly in the towns of Sariaya, Tayabas, Lucena and Lucban in either backyard industries or large scale operations.

The usual recipe would be like this , do keep in mind recipe varies from household to household

1 kg of cubed (as opposed to chopped or ground) pork with fat.

¼ cup of oregano extract (can be more or less depending on taste)

1 teaspoon of paprika

1 teaspoon of salt

1 cup of chopped garlic (acts as the preservative)

Sausage casing (pork intestines preferred)

How to cook

Get a pan place the sausages in it and add water till the sausages are half covered. Boil the sausages and prick them so that the casings won’t explode. Cook till the water is all evaporated and what remains is the oil from the sausage.

Longganisang Lucban is best eaten hot either in itself as a viand or part of the infamous longsilog(longganisa, sinangag at itlog). Some prefer to dip it in vinegar with garlic though my personal preference is to dip it in brown sugar.

September 12, 2008 Posted by | Food | , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Dreaming of Lucena’s Chami

The reason I hate travel is because of noodles. Don’t get me wrong I love noodles (pancit) but I want it cooked the Lucena way.

Chami is like lomi with less broth and it is cooked stirred fried and has become a signature dish of areas near Lucena city such as Tayabas, Sariaya and Pagbilao.The noodles used are fresh egg noodles and usually pork or chicken stock is used to flavor it during cooking.

I won’t get into its origin and how it is cooked because there are hundreds way to cook just like Adobo, every household have their own way of cooking it.

It is a shame that wikipedia has an entry for Lomi but none for Chami. Hope somebody updates wikipedia soon 🙂

September 10, 2008 Posted by | Food, Travel | , , , , , | 1 Comment